In Journalism, Love Defeats Fear

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The investigative journalist who wears mask to hide his identity, Anas Armeyaw Anas (right) and Executive Director of Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism, Rana Sabbagh (photo by Hafizh Gemilang)

The first thing he did after reaching the stage was putting a poster in front of his podium. It contains a picture of a woman and three words: Justicia Para Miroslava.

“One night we talked on the phone. Next morning I found out she had been killed,” Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Mexican newspaper Norte de Ciudad Juarez, Oscar Cantu, said.

Throughout his entire career, Cantu had been through many emotional moments, but nothing shook him more than what he called “the tragic murder of Miroslava.”

Journalist Miroslava Breach was shot eight times in her car and found with a note saying: “For being a loud-mouth.”

Cantu, who closed his newspaper after Miroslava was killed because he didn’t want any more collaborators to lose their lives, lamented, “Media owners don’t demand for journalists who have been killed.”

Spotlight on investigative journalism: perspectives from Southeast Asia and beyond (photo by Hafizh Gemilang)

Miroslava wasn’t the only journalist who was harmed for doing her job. Philippines investigative journalist and CEO of Rappler Maria Ressa said she often received abusive comments from people who dislike her stories.

Recently, a fake news site published a viral fake story about rape concerning her. Many retired and active soldiers attacked her online. According to Ressa, it got so bad that a netizen wrote an open letter to Chief of Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP), General Eduardo Ano.

Ano publicly apologized to Ressa and ordered Provost Marshall General of the AFP to thoroughly investigate the matter.

(Read: Fake News Maria Ressa)

“There’s hope, but, welcome to my life,” she said, laughing.

Why would anyone stay being a journalist then?

“Love is my motivation. Love of justice,” Cantu said. “In journalism, love defeats fear.”

“In journalism, love defeats fear.”

Executive Director of Arab Reporters for Investigave Journalism, Rana Sabbagh, explained, “We’re doing this job knowing we’ll offend people, but many people will be touched in a good way.”

The investigative journalist who wears mask to hide his identity, Anas Armeyaw Anas (right) and Executive Director of Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism, Rana Sabbagh (Photo by Hafizh Gemilang)

“I’m doing what benefits my society,” award-winning undercover investigative journalist from Ghana, Anas Aremeyaw Anas, said.

“I’m doing what benefits my society,”

Anas, who always seen wearing a mask because he needs to conceal his identity said, “Journalism must lead to progress in society. You have to find stories that you want to tell people, which can change your community.”

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